Diet & Alzheimer’s: Ketones Over Carbs or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love The Ketogenic Diet*

Grade: Excellent

The ketogenic diet induces ketosis and that’s a good thing because ketosis brings with it a raft of health benefits.  It’s a diet in the sense that what you eat is important, but how much you eat isn’t that important.  Also there’s the whole weight loss thing, but that’s more of a side note.  The importance of this diet lies in its mechanisms to prevent and possibly even treat Alzheimer’s.

Moving from Glycolysis to Ketosis

Most diets include a high percentage of simple carbs (bread, rice, pasta, etc.).  Those carbs along with sugar (in all its forms) are quickly converted to glucose.  This glucose is stored in the liver as glycogen and the rest used by mitochondria as the substrate for making energy.  This assumes that one is not eating excessive amounts of carbs and sugar as that would produce chronic stress on the system and lead to weight gain on the way to full blown diabetes.

The ketogenic diet is high in fat and has few or even zero carbs.  In response to the lack of dietary glucose, the body taps the glycogen stored in the […]

By |2018-09-21T09:50:45+00:00September 21st, 2018|Prevention and Treatment|5 Comments

Diet & Alzheimer’s: Aspirin

Aspirin changes the metabolism of omega-6 fatty acids such that more anti-inflammatory compounds are produced.  Aspirin also changes the metabolism of omega-3s such that even more anti-inflammatory compounds result. Fasting activates PPAR alpha which upregulates TFEB which results in new lysosomes in brain cells.  Lysosomes eat the misfolded proteins in cells that cause amyloid-beta plaques and tau tangles.  Aspirin appears to produce the same result without fasting.  What if we fast and take aspirin?  It stands to reason that aspirin may enhance the positive effects of fasting when it comes to brain health.

By |2018-08-14T06:06:11+00:00August 14th, 2018|Prevention and Treatment|1 Comment

Eat Curry Avoid Alzheimer’s: UCLA Study of Curcumin Shows Improved Memory and Reduced Brain Pathology

Compared to placebo, the curcumin group showed significant improvement for primary verbal memory, primary visual memory and measure of attention.  PET scans showed strong evidence that amyloid beta deposits and tau tangles in the amygdala declined significantly in the curcumin group.  Furthermore, deposits and tangles in the hypothalmus of the placebo group showed a significant increase after 18 months, but the curcumin group was spared this unfortunate result.

By |2018-01-25T14:04:53+00:00January 25th, 2018|Prevention and Treatment|2 Comments